News

02. Jan 2012

Nordecon hands Seaplane Port hangars over to Maritime Museum

With key construction work at the site completed, Nordecon today handed over the Seaplane Port hangars to the Estonian Maritime Museum. Work will now continue with the complex task of installing the museum’s exhibits.

With key construction work at the site completed, Nordecon today handed over the Seaplane Port hangars to the Estonian Maritime Museum. Work will now continue with the complex task of installing the museum's exhibits.

Vink explained that while construction work is now complete, visitors will still have to wait until spring to enjoy what the museum has to offer. "The building work's done and dusted, and we've handed it over to the client, but installing the exhibitions is going to be a painstaking process. And then of course there'll be all the other little jobs that need doing in connection with that. Once that's all done, though, I've no doubt the grand opening will be the event of the spring and summer, and that the museum will be one of the city's biggest drawcards for years to come."

Facts about the construction of the Seaplane Port hangars

-          Originally completed in 1917, the hangars are thought to represent the oldest reinforced concrete structure of their kind in the world.

-          The restoration work carried out on the hangars' concrete structures has ensured that the building will remain one of the most unique in the world for decades to come.

-          The Estonian Maritime Museum will open the doors on an exceptional exhibition at the Seaplane Port this spring comprising more than two hundred different exhibits.

-          The jewels in the crown of the exhibition will be the seaplane Short184, the submarine Lembit and the icebreaker Suur Tõll in all their glory. And in addition to the real exhibits at the museum, visitors will also get the chance to fly over Tallinn, take a round-the-world trip in the Yellow Submarine and navigate around Tallinn Bay in simulators.